Monday, April 13, 2015

Doodles and Daydreams Cake

Doodle and Daydreams Cake

I had the most fun making this layer cake inspired by my blogging friend Sweetapolita’s new book.

Have you seen it yet? It’s full of all kinds of fun and yum. Page after page of recipes for luscious layer cakes and other gorgeous and adorable creations that make me want to get in the kitchen and play.

The Sweetapolita Bakebook

Here it is. The Sweetapolita Bakebook. When I saw the cover for the first time, I fell instantly in love. This cake spoke to me right away with it’s whimsical, playful design and I knew it would have to be one of the first things I tried.

Edible Ink Writing Pens

It also didn’t hurt that I already had more than my share of edible ink writing pens on hand so I basically had to make it.

Fondant

This is a big 8-inch triple layer chocolate cake filled with swiss meringue buttercream and covered in a layer of white fondant.

Basically, a big blank canvas for your creativity.

Doodling

Once the cake is covered in fondant and the exterior has dried out a bit, you can start doodling. Outline or draw illustrations using the black edible ink pen first and let the ink completely dry before coloring in the shapes to help prevent the colors from mixing together.

It also helps to work in one area at a time instead of all over the place to help avoid smearing the black ink. For instance, if you accidentally rest your hand on the surface of the cake. Whoops. Yeah. That’s me. I’m a hand rester when I draw and I quickly realized that drawing at a 90-degree angle and trying not to rest my hand on the surface of the cake was a little harder than I had imagined. That’s ok though because I think some of my slightly wonky drawings add to the wonder and whimsy of this cake.

Edible Ink Pens

I drew simple sweets and things using pastel colors, but I could also easily see this transformed into a comic strip cake with words like POW and KABOOM and WHAM, etc. … all drawn in primary colors. It would be too much fun!

Coloring

Once the black ink has dried, you can start coloring in the drawings. This was the fun part … to see it all come alive from black and white to bold and bright.

YAY Cake

YAY. YAY. YAY. The super cutest cake. I love it. Thanks Rosie. And now, all I can think about is making another one. A fake styrofoam cake that I can cover in fondant to keep on display and look at every single day.

Simple and Splendid Chocolate Cake

P.S. This cake is totally delicious. The project in the book calls for a black velvet cake recipe, but I switched it up a bit so I could try out Rosie’s Simple & Splendid Chocolate Cake and OMG………

Boom Clap

Boom Clap! So. Soooooooo goooood!

Simple and Splendid Chocolate Cake

2 1/2 cups all purpose flour
2 1/2 cups superfine sugar
1 cup dutch process dark cocoa powder
2 teaspoons baking soda
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups buttermilk
1 cup hot coffee
3/4 cup vegetable oil
3 large eggs, room temperature
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees fahrenheit. Grease the bottoms of three 8 X 2-inch round cake pans and line them with parchment paper.
  • Sift flour, sugar, cocoa powder, baking soda, baking powder and salt into the bowl of an electric stand mixer.
  • In a large spouted measuring glass, whisk together buttermilk, coffee, oil followed by the eggs, and vanilla.
  • With the mixer on low, gradually add the milk mixture and beat until smooth, about a minute. Use a rubber spatular to scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl. Divide batter evenly among prepared pans.
  • Bake the first two layers in the center of the oven for about 20-25 minutes or until a toothpick inserted comes out with a few crumbs. Repeat with final layer.
  • Let cakes cool in their pans on a wire rack for ten minutes. Using a knife, loosen the sides of the cakes. Place a large piece of plastic wrap over on top of the cake pan and then place a wire rack on top. Invert holding the cake board and wire rack together and place on the counter. Lift the pan and then peel off parchment paper from the cake. Wrap the cake layer with the plastic wrap and repeat with other two layers. Place layers in the freezer for about 15 minutes or fridge for 30 minutes while you make the frosting.

Swiss Meringue Buttercream

7 large egg whites
1 3/4 cups granulated sugar
2 cups unsalted butter, room temperature and cut into cubes
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
pinch of salt

  • Add egg whites and sugar to the bowl of an electric stand mixer. Make sure it is wiped completely clean and dry first. Place bowl over a pot of simmering water. Cook, whisking gently and continuously until the temperature reaches 130 degrees fahrenheit.
  • Return the bowl to the mixer and fit it with the whisk attachment. Beat on medium high speed until it reaches the stiff peak stage (thick and glossy) about 2-3 minutes. Decrease the speed to medium and beat until the bottom of the bowl is cool, about 10 minutes.
  • Switch to the paddle attachment and with the mixer running on low speed, add the butter one piece at a time. Beat until the mixture is silky smooth, about a minute. Add the vanilla and salt, and beat on low speed for three more minutes.
  • Tint frosting if desired.

To assemble and decorate:

  • Remove cake layers from the freezer or fridge and level each layer by trimming the tops of the cakes flat with a long serrated knife. Snack on trimmings while you finish the cake. : )
  • Place a dollop of frosting in the center of a cake board and place the first layer with the cut side down, on the cake board. The frosting will help keep it from sliding around. Place the cake board on a turntable for decorating. Spread frosting on top and then add the second cake layer, cut side down. Spread on more frosting and top with third layer, cut side down.
  • Apply more frosting on the top layer and down the sides for a crumb coat. The crumb coat is intended to catch any loose crumbs and to keep them from getting in your final layer of frosting. Once covered, you can use a bench scraper to easily smooth the sides.
  • Place the cake in the refrigerator for about 30 minutes for the frosting to firm up some. Then remove and apply a final coat of fluffy frosting on the top and sides. Make sure the surface is as smooth as possible. When frosted and smooth, return to the refrigerator at least one hour to set up before covering in fondant.
  • Roll out fondant to almost 1/4 inch thick with a diameter that equals at least the width of the top of the cake plus the height of the sides. In my case the cake was 5 inches tall X 2 plus 8 inches wide. So I rolled the fondant out until it was over 18 inches in total diameter.
  • Lift the fondant using your rolling pin and carefully unroll it on top of the cake. Smooth the fondant on top of the cake and down the sides with a fondant smoother and trim off the excess around the base.
  • NOTE: I’d recommend Rosie’s book to get all her tips on working with frosting and fondant to help you out. She has lots of tips and goes into much more detail than I have here.
  • Place the fondant covered cake back in the fridge for 1-2 hours to dry out before drawing. When firm and the fondant is dry, doodle little drawings with a black edible ink writing pen. Return to the fridge for another 1-2 hours to allow the black ink to dry. Remove and fill in the drawings with the colored edible ink pens of your choosing.
  • The cake will keep at room temperature for 24 hours and up to 3 days in the refrigerator.

Recipes and project adapted from The Sweetapolita Bakebook by Rosie Alyea, © 2015.

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Enjoy!!!

Here’s a peek at some of the other amazingness inside The Sweetapolita Bakebook.
I think you’ll love it.

The Sweetapolita Bakebook

* This post contains affiliate links to Amazon.

Monday, March 30, 2015

Easter Basket Cake Pops

Easter Basket Cake Pops

Look what the Easter Bunny brought early… bite-size baskets filled with candy and cake, too.

Rips Licorice Belts

I used licorice belts for the basket handles. Just cut them into 1/4 inch strips that are about 3 1/2 inches long and set aside until you are ready to decorate.

If you cut them too long, they’ll droop on top of the pop.

Okay, now let’s shape the basket bases.

Baskets

Follow the directions for basic cake pops and then shape the cake and frosting mixture into basket bottoms. Take a look at this post on how I shaped cylinders, but basically I roll them into balls first and then shape by hand as much as possible. When the basket shape starts to form, you can slide it on a wax-paper covered surface to achieve distinct edges.

After you have them shaped, use a toothpick to make two indentions on the top of the base. This is to help the handles have a slightly deeper place to be inserted for stability.

Dip the cake pops into melted chocolate coating and then insert the handles before the coating sets. That’s probably the trickiest part of making these pops.

Easter Basket Cake Pops

But, it’s the rest of the decorating that’s the most fun.

Basket Cake Pop

First, draw an outline around the top of the basket with a toothpick dipped in melted candy wafers. Then sprinkle with white sanding sugar before the coating sets. Use a clean toothpick to straighten up any lines.

You can also use an alternating candy wafer color here to jazz them up even more. I went simple on the bases though, so the Easter eggs and grass would stand out.

Sweetarts Jelly Beans

The eggs are Sweetarts jelly beans. I like these because the colors are so vibrant.

Easter Eggs

Just dip the ends of the “eggs” in melted green candy wafers and attach to the center, top of the basket and let dry.

Green Candy Shred

Now for the grass. I love this Green Candy Shred from my product line with Make’n Mold.

It’s pretty perfect for Easter grass, but you can also use shredded coconut tinted in pastel colors for a thicker grass.

Making Baskets

With a toothpick dipped in coating, apply more melted green candy wafers on the top of the basket, around the eggs and in between the handles. Then gently press the green shred into the coating and let dry.

Easter Basket Cake Pops

And that’s it!

Now, I did have to stop myself from overdoing these. I thought the baskets might have needed something else, but maybe if the borders were in alternating colors that would be enough for me.

In the meantime, I put a bow on it … with some leftover bows from last weeks bunny cookie pops.

Bow Update: Just went into the kitchen after finishing this post and the bows on the handles aren’t a good idea. They’ll make the handles droop from their weight. Instead try attaching them to the front of the basket if you want to add them. : )

Easter Basket Cake Pops

Too cute. Enjoy!!!

Monday, March 23, 2015

Bunny Cookie Pops

Easter Bunny Cookie Pops

I decorated some more oreos for you. Moreos. ; ) … I loved the letter cookie pops I posted last week so much that I couldn’t resist making cute cookie bunnies, too! They’re as easy as they are adorable.

Playful Shapes Candy Mold

Bunny Ears

I used my  Playful Shapes Mold to make the bunny ears and bow ties. It came in pretty handy for these little hoppers.

P.S. … take a look at these bunny cookies from Cake Pop Crazy on instagram using the mustache and eyeglasses shapes from the same mold … super cute!

You can also use the mold to make flower petals and I’ve seen them used by Stacey’s Cake Pops to make crazy cute turkey feathers, too.

Bunny Ears

But for bunnies, fill the center of the ear shapes with melted pink candy wafers and let dry. Then fill the rest of the mold cavity with melted white candy wafers. Tap the mold on the counter to even out the coating. Then, place the ears in the fridge for a few minutes to set quickly. Remove the shapes from the mold by pressing on the plastic and twisting the mold over a towel on the counter.

Make the molded shapes ahead so you can save time the day you want to decorate.

Keep in mind: You could also make your own ear shapes if you don’t have a mold. Just pipe melted candy coating on wax paper in the shape you need. If you want a pink center, pipe the pink first, let it dry and then pipe over and around it with white to finish the shape. Use a toothpick to help guide the coating if necessary. When you’re ready to use them, the fronts of the ears will be flat with a pink center… the backs of the ears will probably be a little lumpy though.

Oreso

Oreos

Separate the cookies and dip the end of a pink pop stick in melted candy wafers. Press the stick into the creme center and put the cookies back together. You can also add a little coating around the base of the stick to help keep it from falling off. Let the coating set before dipping.

Take a look at last week’s #YAY cookies to see how.

Oreo Cookie Pops

Dip the cookie completely in melted white candy wafers and let the excess fall off.

Dipping Bunny Cookies

Dip the bottom end of two pre-made ears in coating and position on top of the cookie. You’ll want to do one at a time and hold in place for a bit to keep it from falling off. Take your time. Trust me, I did have a few mess-ups before I got the balancing right. Place in a stand and let dry completely.

Bunny Pops

To decorate the faces, I just used a few things.

Candies

White M&M’s or candy gems for cheeks, pastel sunflower seeds for the pink noses, my DIY Sugar Eyes, and bows I made using the same Playful Shapes Mold.

Bunny Cookie

Use melted white coating to attach the individual candies. When it sets, the candies will be glued to the front of the cookie. Then just draw the eyes with a black edible ink pen.

You can find my Playful Shapes Mold, Pop Sticks, Candy Wafers and DIY Sugar Eyes at A.C. Moore Crafts or online directly from Make’n Mold.

But get creative and decorate them in different ways. Once you have ears in place, the front is pretty much a blank canvas. I can see heart sprinkle noses, confetti sprinkle eyes, mini marshmallow cheeks, and more.

Bunny Cookie Pops

Here’s “hopping” you enjoy these cookie cuties.

 

 

Monday, March 16, 2015

Easy Oreo Cookie Pops

YAY Cookie Pops

Here’s a quick and cute, no-bake way to say yay with cookies!
Or say anything else sweet for that matter. It’s a totally fun way to make someone eat their words, too.

Oreos

Just start with your favorite sandwich cookies.

Making Candy Letters

You’ll also need edible letters.

Use a letter candy mold and candy wafers in the color of your choice to make the words.

Fill the mold cavities with melted candy wafers and place the mold in the fridge for a few minutes to set quickly.

Gently twist the mold and/or press the back of the letters to help release them from the mold. Then turn the mold over on a dish towel on the counter so the don’t break when they release.

You can make them ahead of time and save them for when you need them.

Candy Letters

Arrange the letters to say short words like YUM… YAY… HEY… or BAE ; )

Set them aside and then get ready to dip.

Cookie Pops

Separate the cookies. Dip the end of a pop stick into melted candy wafers. Press gently into the creme center and then sandwich the cookies back together.

Let the coating set and when dry, dip the cookies into more melted candy wafers.

Dipping Oreos

I went with sky blue for these so the white letters would pop off the fronts.

sticks

Let the cookie pops dry completely in a cake pop stand or simply lay them flat on a wax paper-covered surface.

HEY Cookie Pops

Attach the candy letters to the front of the cookie pops with a dot of coating to use as glue.

Then say HEY and give them to someone to brighten their day.

Sweet!

Below are the Bakerella for Make’n Mold Items used in this post. You can find them at A.C. Moore Crafts or you can get them online directly from Make’n Mold at the following links.

Pop Sticks
Letters Candy Mold
Numbers Candy Mold (if you want the hashtag symbol)
Sky Blue Candy Wafers
Marshmallow White Candy Wafers

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Cocoa Cake Pops

Cocoa Cake Pops

I’d rather be thinking about spring-themed treats right about now, but man… Winter will not leave. So I made these adorable little mugs of not-so-hot cocoa. Hopefully we’ll be on to warmer weather soon, but in the meantime, I hope you enjoy these cold weather inspired cocoa cake pops. I love how cute they turned out!

Letters Candy Mold

I wanted perfectly-shaped handles for the mugs to help pull off the look, so I thought I could use my Letters Candy Mold to make them and I think they turned out pretty great. If you don’t have a candy mold that would work, you could also just pipe thick C shapes on to wax paper.

Candy Mold

To use the mold, fill the shapes with melted candy wafers using a toothpick or squeeze bottle. Place the mold in the fridge for a few minutes for the candy to set. To release the letters from the mold, give it a gentle twist and push on the plastic from the bottom of the shapes to help release the letters. Hold the mold over a towel so the letters won’t break as they fall out from the mold.

I used the letter C and also used D, G, O, Q by filling a curved portion of those letters to mimic the C.

Candy Letters

You can make the handles ahead of time and then just save them until you need them.

Shaping Cake Pops

Here are the basic cake pop instructions to get you started. Once you have them rolled into balls, continue shaping them by hand. Make an indentation on one end and then roll, rotate and slide the ball on wax paper to form a cylinder like above. The wax paper makes it much easier to shape and achieve defined edges.

Shaped

The indentation in the top of the cylinder shape will act as a well for the “cocoa”.

Cocoa Cake Pops

These pops are dipped in melted marshmallow white candy wafers first and then melted chocolate is placed in the well. If you made a perfect cylinder shape without a well and dipped the pops in coating, once you placed the chocolate coating on top for the cocoa it could look like it was sitting too high above the mug. But you can totally skip the whole indenting step if you want. They’ll still be cute.

Here’s how they are dipped and decorated.

Sipping Cake Pops

Dip the cylinder in the melted coating allowing the excess to fall off. Gently press a handle shape into the side of the pop and attach a red jumbo heart sprinkle on the front before the coating sets. Let dry completely and then fill the well with melted chocolate coating (Note: I mixed chocolate with vanilla to get a lighter, more cocoa-like shade of chocolate.) Use a toothpick to coerce the coating into a circular shape if needed. You can also gently tap the bottom of the pop stick on the counter to help settle and flatten out the coating.

Mini Marshmallows

But wait. We need teeny, tiny marshmallows for our cocoa.

Cocoa Cake Pop

Before the chocolate sets, place 3-5 into the coating.

Oh so cute!

Cocoa Cake Pops

Enjoy!!! Hope these warm your heart.

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